Conferences held by the European Research Centre

May 2011 — Conference

New Approaches to Book and Paper Conservation-Restoration

From 9th to 11th May 2011, there will be a start-up conference "New Approaches in Book and Paper Conservation-Restoration in Europe" in Horn, Austria.

 

conference board:
Joseph Schirò
, Heritage Malta
István Kecskeméti, National Archives, Helsinki
René Larsen, Konservatorskolen, Copenhagen
Elissveta Moussakova, St.St.Cyril and Methodius National Library, Sofia
Patricia Engel, European Research Centre for Book and Paper Conservation-Restoration, Horn

 

see also: New Approaches to Book and Paper Conservation‑Restoration, edited by Patricia Engel, Joseph Schirò, René Larsen, Elissaveta Moussakova and Istvan Kecskeméti, Wien/Horn: Verlag Berger 2011, XXIV, 748 pp., ISBN 978-3-85028-518-6; 42,– Euro — available at Verlag Berger

 

The conference in Horn aims to bring together conservators, librarians and archivists, collection managers and many more professionals in the field of book and paper conservation-restoration who fight for the safeguarding and maintenance of our cultural book- and paper-heritage from all over Europe and even further countries. There will be over 50 speakers from 28 different countries. During the entire conference experts on funding programmes will also be present.

 

The main question the conference puts forward is: what is needed to preserve our heritage? From the papers handed in, one can already see the variety of problems ranging from conservation theories, to the use of materials which are still not available but are on the wish list, and to further education.

 

At the end of the conference the most pressing research topics which so far have not been answered need to be defined. The fact that there will be so many experts with such profound background available in one place is pre-designed to immediately build teams of researchers who would already know which programmes would possibly suit their demands (due to the presence of funding experts). The participants would leave the conference prepared to cooperate and do research in book and paper conservation-restoration.

See also other webpages about the conference.

 

Sponsors

Niederösterreich-Werbung
Die Niederösterreichische Versicherung

Parchment Assesment

16th – 20th May 2011, Horn, Austria

Further education course held by Dr. René Larsen,
Dorte Vestergaard Poulsen, Kathleen Muhlen Axelsson
The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Conservation
Esplanaden 34, DK 1263 Copenhagen K

Workshop

The Workshop is especially directed to training conservators-restorers, curators, archivists and librarians in managing and monitoring of collections of parchments as well as the assessment of their damage in environmental ageing conditions. Participants will be taught the macroscopic and microscopic examination (visual assessment) techniques used to assess the "state of health" of parchment. The use the databases created by the IDAP, PDAP (Parchment Damage Assessment Programme), EWS (Early Warning System) and DUPDA (Digitised User-Friendly Parchment Damage Atlas) will be demonstrated.
The participants will be provided with materials and guidelines for the laboratory experiments.

 
Parchment books and charts belonging to historic libraries and archives of Horn will provide all sorts of parchments and their condition states for demonstration.
 

 

 

Globe Conservation

21st – 25th November 2011, Horn

further education course helf by Dr. Patricia Engel

This course is designed for conservators in the field of paper conservation – restoration, with the necessity to extend their level of expertise to include globes, and for students of conservation (MA level or higher).

The course is comprised of a theoretical and a practical training.

The practical training will take place in Horn from the 21st–25th November, 2011. During this course, participants will scientifically analyze the material, learn how to use the database for globe technology and perform those analyses, which will subsequently be necessary for establishing a conservational concept. The analyses can be performed by any conservator with standard equipment.

In addition, a conservational concept will be established for each participant's globe and the first steps of conservation will be performed. Furthermore, the participants will learn how to keep the necessary documentation. For those participants interested in particular conservational techniques beyond those needed on their globes, dummy globes will be provided.

The workshop will take place in the newly equipped rooms of the "Horner Werkstätten".
Participants must bring a globe in need of conservation and the standard tools, e.g.: scalpel, spatula, brushes, etc…

CV

Patricia Engel holds a doctorate of the Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw; she studied conservation in Vienna Academy of Fine Arts (1979-1984 Magister) and Warsaw (2007 doctorate). She worked from 1984-1999 as a conservator in the Austrian National Library, Vienna, the German State Library, Berlin and as freelancer for churches, libraries and museums and was course assistant at the ICCROM Paper Conservation course 1991.

From 2000-2008 she installed and headed the university chair for Book and Paper Conservation in Hildesheim University for Applied Sciences and Arts. Besides her main obligations in this time she taught conservation of books and paper art work including globes under the SOCRATES exchange in the universities of Fine Art Antwerp and Warsaw and headed an international project with Armenia. Engel gave lectures in the State University Novosibirsk and for the Goethe Institute in Colombo, Sri Lanka as well as for Malta Heritage students.

Recently she is the scientific head of the European Research Centre for Book and Paper Conservation-Restoration and invited to lecture in Zadar summer school in the Study of Historical Manuscripts.

Globe conservation: amongst other focuses Patricia Engel worked in the globe museum in Vienna National Library, supervised the rebuilding of the than newly made globe museum from the conservation point of view, taught globe conservation in Ascona Centro del bel Libro and was responsible and together with Michael Rasmussen author of the internet course “Globe Conservation”, a further education tool by the Hornemann Institute.

 

Prior to the practical course, you will have access to an E-learning Course developed and lectured by Patricia Engel. This online course will serve as a guarantee that the practical course can start at a high level. The online course is designed to be used for individualized study at an individualized pace. The lecturer will be available to the students and a tutor will assist you whenever you encounter technical or content-related difficulties. After the practical course in Horn, the online course will be available for 3 more weeks so that the lecturer can respond to any more questions that may arise.For further information concerning the course see:

http://www.hornemann-institut.<wbr></wbr>de/english/course_globes.php

 

Recognizing, Classifying and Manufacturing Decorated Paper

21st – 23rd February 2012, Horn, Austria

Further education course held by Mag. Ilse Mühlbacher. She graduated from Vienna University of Applied Arts (Script design) and from University of Fine Arts Vienna (art teacher) and is recently working at the Austrian National Library.

Workshop

This workshop, consisting of an introductory PowerPoint-supported lecture as well as practical exercises, addresses librarians and people working in libraries, museums and archives who are interested in the assessment and documentation of decorated paper. The workshop will cover the history and development of decorated paper, their application in the field of bookmaking, a review and detailed description of manufacturing techniques, as well as methods to identify the various techniques.
The history of decorated paper is closely connected to the invention of paper itself and goes back to the early part of the 15th century. At that time, a great number of manufacturing techniques were devised, which, in combination with each other, brought forth a great variety of decorations, patterns and design possibilities.
A multitude of decorated paper can be found in libraries and archives, mostly in the form of book covers and book end papers; however, decorated paper was also used to inlay chests, cabinets, and musical instruments and can be found in collections. The first collections of decorated paper originate at the end of the 19th century and are very helpful as a guide for the purpose of classification. The complexity facing the proper documentation of decorated paper lies in the great diversity of manufacturing techniques and the judgment necessary to correctly identify and denominate them.
In the workshop, a review of the history of decorated paper and its manufacturing techniques will be followed by a discussion of selected examples that highlight the problems surrounding the identification of decorated paper as well as the options available for doing so, focusing both on the difficulties pertaining to correct dating and on the relevant terminology. A number of processed and unprocessed specimens will first be presented to illustrate an academically founded classification system; subsequently, books, papers, folders or other pertinent objects brought by the participants can be discussed, identified and described.

Contents

Theory:

  • Definition of decorated paper
  • Decorated paper in books: book covers and end papers
  • History of decorated paper
  • Manufacturing through the ages
  • Trade
  • Pattern collection
  • Differences in techniques
  • Documentation and description


Practice:

Manufacture of hand decorated paper:

  • Brush paper
  • Paste paper in different variations
  • Dribbeled paper
  • Sprinkled paper
  • Marbeled paper

 

 

Bosses and Clasps III

12th – 13th March 2012, Horn

Further education course held by Mag. Elisabeth Krebs.

The course aims to give an overview over the metals actually used for historical clasps and bosses and other book furnishing. Examples will provide the audience with ability to identify the various metals and alloys and results of other techniques.
Furthermore examples of the damages are shown and explained and a brief introduction on how to react to them in the course of conservation are outlined.
The Piarist Library with its manifold of historical books can serve as study source.
Lecturer: Mag. Elisabeth Krebs, metal conservator Vienna

CV

Elisabeth Krebs graduated in 1979 as sculptutrer and in 1984 as metal conservator both from the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, then worked as conservator in New York, Nürnberg and Vienna in various museums. Since 1992 freelance conservator specialized on iron smith work and large scale objects.

 

 

 

Understanding of the Parchment in the Medieval Manuscripts

21st - 26th May 2012, Horn, Austria

Further education course held by Jiří Vnouček, conservator, The Royal Library Copenhagen.

Workshop

Parchment is one of the oldest and also most durable writing materials. To be able to secure its proper preservation or eventual conservation it is very important to understand its complicated structure and way of the behavior. Experiments with practical parchment making can help to learn more about parchment in medieval manuscripts and even more to recognize different types of imperfection and defects coming already from its production so they are misunderstood with damage coming from later use and way of storage of the manuscripts.

Structure of the course

  1. Practical parchment making workshop which will cover all basic steps in the parchment making: dehairing, cleaning of the flesh side, stretching on the frames, dry shaving and pouncing, final surface treatment, preparation for writing of the manuscript.
  2. Theoretical lectures about the history of the parchment-making and different types of the parchments for writing purposes and the way of their preparation.
  3. Lectures about the visual examination of the parchment in the medieval manuscripts and interpretation of their damage and imperfection coming from the manufacture of the parchment (based on personal experience of this parchment-making course)
  4. Practical visual examinationtion and identification of different damage in real historical manuscripts. Duration of course 5 days of theoretical lectures (morning) and practical parchment making (afternoon) will include at least half day of excursion to nearby archive or library where would be possible to study historical parchment material.

 

Course is designed for the conservators of parchment who have already some knowledge about parchment and good practical experience with its conservation and want to learn more about writing parchment made for medieval manuscripts. But the course could be also found interesting for codicologists or curators of manuscript collection. The course main target is to understand the parchment and not parchment conservation. On another hand certain discussion about conservation of parchment will be raised by understanding of its special characteristics and behavior which come from the way in which is produced.

 

Identification of European Paper

4th - 8th June 2012, Horn

Lecturer: Dipl. Ing. Gangolf Ulbricht

This course is designed for librarians, archivists, antiquars, bookbinders, conservators, anyone else, who is interested in the topic.

The course is comprised of a theoretical and a practical training.

Historic raw material and traditional techniques will give the starting topic to this course. Then paper samples are made. Thus knowledge about paper is gained and material for comparing is created. This step by step approach enables the participants to understanding the material and “read” the paper with simple methods. Sound, stiffness, mould-structure, paper structure, water marks and so on can supply us with valuable information concerning age and conservators decision making but also enable us to identify exceptions in paper production. Machine-made papers and special papers will be also dealt with. Films and a collection of samples support the oral lectures.


The course is restricted to 8 participants. Course languages: English and German (Kurs auf Deutsch und Englisch)

CV

1980-1983 Paper Makers school

1983-1988 Technical University Dresden, Pulp- and Paper Techniques

1989 Researcher (ZP Heidenau/Dresden)

Since 1992 own workshop for Paper in Berlin

1992 Moulin du Verger, France – studies

1998 12 months studies in Japan

Ulbricht is lecturer in various universities in Germany, Austria, Italy.

 

 

 

Identification of Asian Paper

11th – 15th June 2012, Horn

Lecturer: Dipl. Ing. Gangolf Ulbricht

This course is designed for librarians, archivists, antiquars, bookbinders, conservators, anyone else, who is interested in the topic.

The course is comprised of a theoretical and a practical training.

The knowledge about various Asian papers is gained via understanding of the raw material, procedure of paper making in Asia and due to own fibre-preparation and paper-making in Asian style. The resulting self made samples form a valuable collectithe on for comparing with paper to be identified. With simple methods, available to everyone for example Chinese, Japanese and Thai papers can be distinguished.

Films and a collection of samples support the oral lectures.

The course is restricted to 8 participants. Course languages: English and German (Kurs auf Deutsch und Englisch)

CV

1980-1983 Paper Makers school

1983-1988 Technical University Dresden, Pulp- and Paper Techniques

1989 Researcher (ZP Heidenau/Dresden)

Since 1992 own workshop for Paper in Berlin

1992 Moulin du Verger, France – studies

1998 12 months studies in Japan

Ulbricht is lecturer in various universities in Germany, Austria, Italy.

Capita selecta: proteins; natural organic dyes and pigments

3rd – 7th September 2012, Horn, Austria

Further education course held by Dr. Jan Wouters

Short description of the course

Introduction

A short introduction will be given to understand why the analysis of organic materials in art requires an approach different from the analysis of inorganics. It will explain that the key features of organic analysis are analytical and spatial resolution. It will lead to suggesting logical sequences of hyphenated analytical approaches.

Proteins

The course on proteins aims at improving the understanding of the diversity of proteins present in materials used for the creation of objects of art and culture as well as for their conservation. The traject of understanding starts from the elementary building blocks, amino acids, and ends with the smallest observable morphology. The clarification of the scanning electron microscopic morphology of a collagen microfibril and of its properties is taken as an example. The multi-level spatial configuration of proteins will be explained and will be at the basis for understanding protein degradation and enzyme activities.
The potential of calibrated amino acid analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography will be illustrated with a series of examples within a heritage context.
Practicals include the making of models of amino acids and small peptides to illustrate optical and position isomerism and to understand spatial configurations; the calculation of the isoelectric point of some amino acids will improve the understanding of this important parameter.

Natural organic dyes and pigments

The course on natural organic dyes and pigments aims at explaining why the enormous diversity of these materials should be considered an advantage for contributing to the understanding of heritage, rather than a disadvantage. Nowedays, the analysis of organic dyes and pigments should stretch beyond the mere reporting that such a material is present, without any further specification. The course will give a detailed overview of organic colourant chemical classes. It will report on the structure of a relevant research project. It will show the potential of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a diode-array and a mass detector for identifying up to seven biological sources, used to perform one single colouration in the past. Several other examples will show how detailed organic colourant analysis may contribute to the understanding of heritage.
Practicals include dyeing experiments with natural organic colourants to illustrate the main dyeing processes.

Elaborate description of the course content

Proteins

  • A short history
  • Correlations between perception and composition
  • Classification of proteins
  • Amino acids: basic structure; isomerism; amphoteric character; isoelectric point; all structures; isoelectric point calculations
  • Peptides
  • Conformation of proteins: primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures
  • Bonds and interactions in and between polypeptide chains
  • The conformation of collagen, leading to the construction of a collagen fibril
  • Proteins in use in art and in art conservation practice: gelatin; ovalbumin; casein
  • Alteration/degradation phenomena in proteins: denaturation; oxidation; hydrolysis
  • Enzymes: history; importance; catalytic action; important parameters to observe; hints for purchase; important enzyme classes (proteases, amylases, lipases)
  • Practicals
  • Calibrated amino acid analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection at the sub-microgram of protein level
  • Sources of error in amino acid analysis
  • Examples of contributions of calibrated amino acid analysis to improving the understanding of heritage: paint binding medium; archeaological textile pseudomorphs; leather degradation; parchment degradation; baroque artificial marble; wool degradation; yarns in colonial Andean tapestries

Natural organic dyes and pigments

  • The definition of a dyestuff
  • The history of dyeing
  • Nomenclature of colouring matters, biological sources and individual components
  • Reading botanical information
  • Chemical structures of main dye classes (quinonoid, flavonoid; indigoid; tannin; other)
  • Important parameters in analytical protocols
  • Analytical resolution and identification potential
  • The high-performance analytical protocol
  • Examples of contributions of organic colourant analysis to the understanding of heritage: a project on early Chinese organic pigments; identification of scale insect red dyes; analysis of faded colourants; technologies for dyeing purple and red in Roman and Coptic Egypt; precolumbian dyes in Colombia and Peru; theory and practice in dyeing Florentine borders; distinguishing between East and West
  • Practicals: dyeing with cochineal, indigo and safflower; pigment preparation with brazilwood

 
 

 

 

Contributions to Conferences and Summer Schools

 

Patricia Engel "Die Tilgungen im Ratmann Sakramentar – Hinweise auf die Traditionspflege im Kloster St. Michael um 1400„ contribution to 1000 Jahre St. Michael in Hildesheim – 16th-18th Sept. 2010, Hildesheim http://193.175.110.9/hornemann/german/St-Michael.php

 

Patricia Engel, Myriam Krutsch, Claudia Näser „Conservation - Restoration of Nubian Leather Finds from the 11th Century” Contribution to “Parchment and Leather, Torun, 21st – 23rd October 2010 http://www.zkpis.umk.pl/?Conference-2010,27

 

Patricia Engel “Books Convey not only Knowledge, but also Beauty” contribution to WORKS OF ART AND CONSERVATION SCIENCE TODAY, Thessaloniki, 26th – 28th November 2010 http://conservationscience-2010.web.auth.gr

 

Patricia Engel “Possibilities to treat Ink Corrosion in the Bound Book”, University of Zadar, Croatia, Department of Library and Information Transfer, Summer School in the Study of Historical Manuscripts, Zadar, 26th-30th September 2011 http://ozk.unizd.hr/summerschool2011/

 

Patricia Engel “Digital Images: A Valuable Scholar's Tool Or Misleading Material?” virtual contribution to International Conference on Integrated Information (IC-ININFO) 2011 Kos, Greece, 29th September – 3rd October 2011 http://www.icininfo.net/

 

Патриция Энгель, Статья для сборника "Грани памяти. Новейшие технологии сохранения и реставрации рукописей и печатного наследия" Октябрь 2011 г., г. Ереван